David Kaye Gallery » William C.G. Hodge

Points of Light: sunsets and flowers
September 19 - October 13, 2013

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Points of Light is a new series that emanates from a number of sources. Since retiring from formal teaching at OCAD University in 2009 I have been doing a great deal of travelling with my partner Robert Wylie. This series is about those travels, especially our travels in Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. This current show deals with some of the flowers we have encountered as well as the wonderful sunsets of Mexico.

Points of Light refers to the Points of Enlightenment I enjoy when I truly look closely at something. I have always been influenced by the Impressionists and their search for an understanding of the quality of light; and their fascination with colour, especially dots of colour. Working with beads, digital photography and fabric collage allow me to explore these interests.

I have started with sunsets and flowers, as these are two enthusiasms that bring me great pleasure.

GALLERY

William C.G. Hodge, Golden Sunset of the Yucatan, 2013, fabric collage, 20.25 X 19 in.William C.G. Hodge, Sky Blue Pink, 2013, fabric collage, 17 X 17 in.William C.G. Hodge, Sky Fire, 2013, fabric collage, 15.5 X 21 in.William C.G. Hodge, Teotitlan Sunset, 2013, fabric collage, 20 X 26 in.William C.G. Hodge, Night Sky, 2013, fabric collage, 15.5 X 27 in.William C.G. Hodge, When the Light has Gone, 2013, fabric collage, 17 X 20 in.William C.G. Hodge, November Night, 2013, fabric collage, 16 X 16 in.William C.G. Hodge, Around the Corner, 2013, digital photo printed on cotton and embellished with glass beads, 5.25 X 7.25 in., 7.75 X 9.5 in. with maple frame, SOLD.William C.G. Hodge, Forever Spring, 2013, digital photo printed on silk and embellished with glass beads, 9.75 X 7 in., 13 X 9.25 in. with maple frameWilliam C.G. Hodge, Raindrops, 2013, digital photo printed on silk and embellished with glass beads, 7.75 X 9 in., 10.25 X 11.25 in. with maple frame, SOLD.William C.G. Hodge, Lily, 2013, digital photo printed on silk and embellished with glass beads, 6.75 X 9.75 in., 9.25 X 12.75 in. with maple frameWilliam C.G. Hodge, Burst, 2013, digital photo printed on silk and embellished with glass beads, 9.25 X 7.5 in., 11.75 X 9.25 in. with maple frame, SOLD.William C.G. Hodge, Fuego Rosa, 2013, digital photo printed on bamboo fabric and embellished with glass beads, 22 X 15.75 with maple frameWilliam C.G. Hodge, Amaryllis, 2013, digital photo printed on bamboo fabric and embellished with glass beads, 22 X 15.75 in. with maple frameWilliam C.G. Hodge, Deadly Beauty, 2013, digital photo printed on bamboo fabric and embellished with glass beads, 15.75 X 22 in. with maple frameWilliam C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Points of Light: sunsets and flowers, Exhibition installation view.

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Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown
June 17 - July 11, 2010

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Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown
June 17 - July 11, 2010

This exhibition has grown out of my interest in the alternative use of glass beads. I was fascinated by the possibility of using colour value and pattern with the glass in a process typically used with paint. The first “portraits” involved just text in the beads and then later, I did a self-portrait. The first in this current style, a portrait of the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, was for an exhibition in 1998 at the McLaren Barnes gallery in Oakville, Ontario. My satisfaction with that piece encouraged me to consider more portrait images.

My problem became just who to do. I started by making a list of possible people and built a list of about thirty names of interest to me. At this point it was a very diverse list of living, and past personalities. When I looked at that list I found it interesting that a vast majority of the people had lived alternate lives - gay, lesbian, transgender, etc. so I decided to limit my work to these people. Some are notorious - Oscar Wilde and Gertrude Stein. Others are perhaps less obvious such as Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward because they never “discussed” publicly their private life. Others like Alan Turing and Charlotte von Malsdorf have only recently become better known.

I researched their lives, accomplishments, and in many cases, their deaths. Some of the stories are very sad, some extraordinary, but all fascinating. Each, I felt, rang true to me and I felt a sort of kinship, and so the list was made.

Each piece took from a few weeks up to six months to produce. I have been working with beads for many years now and it struck me as an appropriate media for the work. One important issue with beads is the addictive nature of the work. The material itself is very sensuous, the colours mysterious and the physical actions pleasurable. I have found working with the beads to be fascinating and constantly surprising. The impressionists, particularly the pointillists, have heavily influenced my past work. The dots of coloured glass was a natural extension to previous works, from painting styles to woven tapestries and cloth. Working with the double images allowed me to add extra significance to each portrait. The most complex being Alan Turing as the background forms his name in stylized binary code. The slowness of the technique allowed me to dwell on each character and think about them as I did the work. Working with beads is somewhat like watching an inkjet printer; it works line by line slowly revealing the image. With the portraits, it is only when the eyes come into the piece that I would know if I succeeded or not with that particular image. Many had to be executed more that once to get the image, and feeling, the way I wanted.

It is my hope that the spectator will be able to appreciate my fascination and interest in each of these portraits.

GALLERY

William C.G. Hodge, Ich Bin: Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, no. 15 beads, 9 3/4 X 7 1/2 in.William C.G. Hodge, Mad Dogs: Sir Noël Pierce Coward, no. 15 beads, 8 3/4 X 7 1/4 in.William C.G. Hodge, Universal Man: Alan Mathison Turing, no. 11 delica Japanese seed beads, 8 1/4 X 5 3/4 in.William C.G. Hodge, Ainadamar: Frederico Garcia Lorca, glass beads, no. 11 delica Japanese seed beads, 10 3/8 X 7 3/4 in.William C.G. Hodge, A Rose: Alice Babette Toklas, micro beads, 3 1/2 X 2 5/8 in.William C.G. Hodge, Emmanations: Gertrude Stein, no. 11 delica Japanese seed beads, 11 X 9 1/2 in.William C.G. Hodge, CIII 3: Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde, no 15 beads, 7 X 6 1/2 in.William C.G. Hodge, There is a Fairy in the Bottom of My Garden: Quentin Crisp, no. 15 beads, 9 X 6 5/8 in.William C.G. Hodge, Room at Last: Virginia Woolf, glass seed beads, gourd stitch, 8 X 6 in.William C.G. Hodge, Play On: Liberace, Swarovski crystals, right-angle stitch, 6.75 X 5 in.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.William C.G. Hodge, Incidentally: portraits of the famous, infamous and unknown, June 17 - July 11, 2010. Exhibition installation view.